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United Kingdom

Phoniatrics/Laryngology in the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom there is no designated specialty entitled phoniatrics. Rather, there are ENT surgeons with a special interest in laryngology. There is a defined route to becoming an ENT surgeon. Initially after medical school the trainee will undertake 2 foundation years. Thereafter the trainee will undertake 2 years of core surgical training that will have been ‘themed’ around ENT. Whilst undertaking this core surgical training they will take the MRCS examination that is a 2-part exam. Thereafter the trainee will be required to undertake a course of 6 year higher surgical training specifically in ENT. This covers the full spectrum of ENT training.

About two thirds of the way through training the trainee will undertake the Intercollegiate FRCS in ENT.

Following completion of the FRCS it is not uncommon for trainees to take ‘fellowships’ either in the UK or abroad before they obtain their CCT and become consultants. This would be one time frame in which budding laryngologists would gain further expertise in laryngology. Post CCT there is also the possibility of obtaining further fellowship training in laryngology, but this is not currently funded by the deaneries of the college.

Once CCT has been granted, the trainee has their name placed on the Specialist Register of the General Medical Council and they can apply for a consultant post. Those who are interested in pursuing laryngology would be likely to apply for an ENT position in a trust that has a Voice Clinic. (The British Voice Association website maintains a UK- wide voice clinics database with an August 2014 update with information on 94 NHS run voice clinics in the UK.) In such a clinic they would likely run a multidisciplinary voice clinic with a speech language therapist as a part of their duties.

John S Rubin MD FRCS FACS, Past- President of the British Voice Association, London

Phoniatrics/Laryngology in the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom there is no designated specialty entitled Phoniatrics. Rather, there are ENT Surgeons with a special interest in Laryngology. There is a defined route to becoming an ENT Surgeon. Initially after Medical School the trainee will undertake 2 foundation years. Thereafter the trainee will undertake 2 years of Core Surgical Training that will have been ‘themed’ around ENT. Whilst undertaking this Core Surgical training they will take the MRCS examination that is a 2-part exam. Thereafter the trainee will be required to undertake a course of 6 year Higher Surgical Training specifically in ENT. This covers the full spectrum of ENT training.

About two thirds of the way through training the trainee will undertake the Intercollegiate FRCS in ENT. Following completion of the FRCS it is not uncommon for trainees to take ‘Fellowships’ either in the UK or abroad before they obtain their CCT and become Consultants. This would be one time frame in which budding Laryngologists would gain further expertise in laryngology. Post CCT there is also the possibility of obtaining further Fellowship training in Laryngology, but this is not currently funded by the Deaneries of the College.

Once CCT has been granted, the trainee has their name placed on the Specialist Register of the General Medical Council and they can apply for a Consultant Post. Those who are interested in pursuing Laryngology would be likely to apply for an ENT position in a Trust that has a Voice Clinic. (The British Voice Association website has a November 2012 update of Voice Clinics with information on 116 Voice Clinics in the UK, 94 of the Voice Clinics had provided extended details.) In such a clinic they would likely run a Multidisciplinary Voice Clinic with a Speech Language Therapist as a part of their duties.

2012 was an important year for Laryngology in the United Kingdom as it marked the first National British Laryngological Association meeting, that was held in December 2012 at the Royal Society of Medicine in London.

Professor John Rubin MD FRCS FACS, Past- President of the British Voice Association, London

Phoniatrics/Laryngology in the United Kingdom

In the UK, there is no designated specialty entitled Phoniatrics. Rather, there are ENT Surgeons with a special interest in Laryngology. There is a defined route to becoming an ENT Surgeon. Initially after Medical School the trainee will undertake 2 foundation years. Thereafter the trainee will undertake 2 years of Core Surgical Training that will have been ‘themed’ around ENT. Whilst undertaking this Core Surgical Training they will take the MRCS examination which is a 2 part exam. Thereafter the trainee will be required to undertake a course of 6 year Higher Surgical Training specifically in ENT. This covers the full spectrum of ENT training. About two thirds of the way through training the trainee will undertake the Intercollegiate FRCS in ENT. Following completion of the FRCS it is not uncommon for trainees to take Fellowships either in the UK or abroad before they obtain their CCT and become Consultants. This would be one time frame in which budding Laryngologists would gain further expertise in Laryngology. Post CCT there is also the possibility of obtaining further Fellowship training in Laryngology, but this is not currently funded by the Deaneries or the College. Once CCT has been granted, the trainee has their name placed on the Specialist Register of the General Medical Council and they can apply for a Consultant Post. Those who are interested in pursuing Laryngology would be likely to apply to an ENT position in a Trust that has a Voice Clinic, there are approximately 100 Voice Clinics in the UK recorded with the British Voice Association. In such a clinic they would likely run a Multidisciplinary Voice Clinic with a Speech Language Therapist as a part of their duties.

Professor John Rubin MD, FACS, FRCS, President of the British Voice Association, London